Month: March 2017

Eating and Exploring

Get to Know the National Dish Quest What is a holiday without the amazing food you get to try, nothing i tell ya! Eating and Exploring is actually the motto over here. Whilst trawling the interwebs, I stumbled upon the Traveleaters – a couple of foodies with major wanderlust (people after my own heart). Few clicks into their blog and I discovered that they were doing a National Food Quest – a mission to try the national dish of every country they visited. How cool is that? Knowing that it would take them yonks to finish the quest, they invited all their readers to join in and I answered their call. The Rules are pretty simple,  in order to qualify you need to: 1.) Have eaten the dish in that actual country Yes! Biryani’s in Birmingham don’t count 2) Have your own picture of the dish.     Simples! So join in the quest with me and tag #NationalFoodQuest with every picture you take. I’ll be tagging #mimaleeeats and captioning my conquests with National Food Quest – so you can check it out on my instagram and/or twitter. …

Book of Month, Longthroat Memoirs

“Nigerians will sit in restaurants – in every part of the world, in Lagos, and in Abuja – and eat sushi, fugu, Peruvian ceviche and piure. They will eat it all with an open mind, a fierce worldliness and a sexy congeniality, and then they will go home and bring out the amala (yam flour) and ewedu soup” “The Yorubas are self-conscious about having one of the least imaginative cuisines in Nigeria and are as finicky about their stews as they are about headtie trends. Only a Yoruba stew cannot be like gele; it isn’t really allowed to be trendy. In every Yoruba home, in the middle of every afternoon, there is a stew pot resting on the hob with the lid slightly askew. The jokes about Yoruba people and their stews, about the habitual, come-rain-or-shine pot of omi-obe, are threadbare. Omi-obe literally translates as “stew water”. It means exactly that: the body of the stew minus meat or fish. It is unquestionably derogatory when it comes out of my Igbo friends’ mouths. “What’s for …